Monday, March 24, 2014

#Savannah Through the Decades: The Sixties' "Not So Fast" Era. Coming to Grips With Historic Preservation.

SAVANNAH Georgia (March 23, 2014) -- We thought you might be surprised to learn that the Savannah romantic / historic inn owners don't drive vintage cars that match the color of the house.

Actually, that thought bridges the stories we'll share -- "Savannah Through the Decades: The Sixties".

Much like the spirit of The Sixties, the small indulgence of owning a Mustang correlates nicely with how progressive Savannah is. One of our Savannah Romantic Inns' owners drives a 2013 Ford Mustang convertible. Are you old enough to remember the buzz when Mustangs first rolled out in 1964, or do you remember reading or hearing about the excitement from your parents or grandparents? After fifty years, the popularity still thrives!

Similar to the example of owning a Ford Mustang convertible, overall this southern belle of a city has a pretty conservative way of life, with some southern vivaciousness thrown in...in small doses! Even our little glance back to learn and connect dots of history here feel pretty tame after we refreshed our reading about 1960s love fests, hippie movements, psychedelic temptations, and the iconic Woodstock Festival that happened elsewhere in America.

Our Romantic Inns thought you might enjoy skipping through highlights of how and where the 1960s touched (and still touches) Savannah, Georgia USA.

Some local natives will recall that showing up for a beach shag music party, playing on Tybee Island pier,  was a pretty hip thing to do. As a matter of fact those beach music band events still happen, most memorably on Labor Day weekend. Tybee Island's still a fun place to be -- for young and old!

Savannah Union Station served the role of
the city's central railroad depot for sixty years,
from its construction in 1902 until its closure in
1962 and eventual demolition in 1963.
Source: Library of Congress

The decade of the 1960s in this charming, southern belle of a city could easily be considered the debutante to a southern ball that is entitled "Progress, Yes! but Not-so-fast!"

This would be especially accurate from the time when seven women wielded their money, influence, and no-nonsense southern charm in order to stall how rapidly developers were tearing down the city's magnificent buildings.

Undeterred, the now-famous seven women set momentum in place to the betterment of Savannah. New construction was deemed inappropriate for downtown, especially when it meant old buildings had to be sacrificed. Their actions were spurred by earlier demolitions of the magnificent DeSoto Hotel, Old City Market place on Ellis Square, and Union Station railroad depot (left) located on West Broad Street (later renamed Martin Luther King, Jr., Boulevard).

At the time the railroad depot (circa 1902) was in the way of a new Interstate 16 route that would dump traffic into downtown Savannah.